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Angela Maiers

Neil,
This post really hits home! I wish that I could be a full time learner, but that "work" thing gets in the way. I thought over break I would catch up and start the year ahead, but I have added so many new blogs to my reader, I am actually farther behind!

What has helped me tremendously has been Twitter. It has become almost a replacement for my reader as new links, blogs , and resources are shared in real time. Many of those you read, and voices you may not yet know of are active on Twitter and generously share knowledge and advice.

As for your blog-don't underestimate the power of sharing the day-to-day happenings in your building. It is easy to get wrapped up in rhetoric and pedagogy and forget what our work is really about...the day to day happenings at schools! Your insight there is invaluable!

Tracie Weisz

I think whenever educators have any kind of a break imposed upon them (injury, illness, scheduled school vacation), we inevitably have the luxury of really letting our thoughts have some breathing room. I have blogged about this recently, and have noticed an underlying current of this same idea in many of the blogs I read lately. Not sure there is an answer to your questions regarding post? read? contribute? That is something I struggle with. There is no easy answer, but the search for one is what motivates me to continue looking, experimenting, and learning. I would agree with Angela's comments that Twitter has been a fantastic resource that opens up new discoveries with almost every post. I also read something recently (it may even have been on this blog) about a daily or weekly goal of posting one picture of your school on Flickr. One of the reasons I read this blog regularly is for the ideas it explores that get at the heart of moving our systems (not just one educator) toward best practices. Educators who post, comment, and read regularly and use this learning in their classrooms are usually the ones who are already changing and evolving. What we really want to know is, how can we work within our whole system (site, district, etc) to change the view?

JillG

Funny to read this post today when I was just talking to my husband about this topic last night. He works in technology in the private sector and was telling me about how company executives have little time to participate in blogging activities online. Yet, it is where many ideas are exchanged that one almost cannot afford to miss in order to keep up with changes in their industry. It seems that online social networking plays a large role in moving industries forward, particularly in the private sector. I believe this can be said about education as well.

I'm still trying to get my head around this as it is new territory.

I would love to see our staff engage in online discussions. One way is to talk about how we can instructionally best serve our students--discussions that may be an extension of our dialogues during meetings. Other ways are to see what is happening in other schools/classrooms perhaps to help troubleshoot an issue in the school, to bring in other ideas that we have not tried, or to formulate our thinking/deepen our understanding around issues in education.

There are challenges though. One is the time factor. Much time goes into planning for instruction that spending time online gets pushed to the back burner. Another is the proficiency around technology. There are those that are very comfortable with using the internet and those to whom the internet is still a very foreign entity.

Regardless, this is clearly a direction that we (the larger 'we'...educators, society, etc.) are going. At the very least, our students who are tech savvy will ensure this.

Neil A. Rochelle

Well, at least I'm not in the same boat. This is what I love about the on-line community. Angela, I have seen so many of your tweets. I try to use it but read more than I post. It is very effective to put something out and get information/resources. I also appreciate the comment about not neglecting the day-to-day experiences to share and that is where the rubber meets the road.

Tracie, you made me laugh outloud. As I try to 'get ahead' while I'm down, I must have bookmarked 6 new blogs I found that excited me and want to follow......making the challenge even harder. Thanks for that!

Jill, we are having quite a bit of success using Ning with our high school teachers. I'd love to chat about that with you. I think it's set up as a closed community right now. You can try checking out virtuallyiroquois@ning.com. I'd also be happy to connect sometime, perhaps a skype call. You can call thesuper518 if you see me on-line.

Neil A. Rochelle

Well, at least I'm not in the same boat. This is what I love about the on-line community. Angela, I have seen so many of your tweets. I try to use it but read more than I post. It is very effective to put something out and get information/resources. I also appreciate the comment about not neglecting the day-to-day experiences to share and that is where the rubber meets the road.

Tracie, you made me laugh outloud. As I try to 'get ahead' while I'm down, I must have bookmarked 6 new blogs I found that excited me and want to follow......making the challenge even harder. Thanks for that!

Jill, we are having quite a bit of success using Ning with our high school teachers. I'd love to chat about that with you. I think it's set up as a closed community right now. You can try checking out virtuallyiroquois@ning.com. I'd also be happy to connect sometime, perhaps a skype call. You can call thesuper518 if you see me on-line.

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