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tfteacher

The number 1 comment you got from teachers was "Unrelenting Dedication to Teacher Improvement"?

Seriously? Most of the teachers I talk to want Unrelenting Dedication to Administration (Principal) Improvement!

Arica

These are powerful habitudes for our leaders to live by. Leaders who do, grow teachers who, in turn, grow young leaders.

Arica

These are powerful habitudes for our leaders to live by. Leaders who do, grow teachers who, in turn, grow young leaders.

David Brown

In my view great leaders in education (as elsewhere) do three critical things very well.

FIRST - they build consensus around a shared great and always external vision, (and what each persons part is in achieving that vision, and what milestone checks there will be on the way).

In this respect whilst improving teacher capabilities are undoubtedly the means to better student education (as has been shown in many places including recently in New Zealand maths education research) the ultimate great vision needs to be focussed outwardly on well educated students. Not inwardly on excellent teachers or even on internal transformational educational processes. It is the great external vision that the leader really needs to be totally committed to and lead the staff to be committed to, even when teachers ask the leader to be committed to them instead, or to internal aspects of the organisation's capabilities instead.

SECOND - great leaders resource their people with time and training and materials so each can do the tasks allocated to them. The points 1 to 4 are about aspects of this.

THIRD - great leaders say thankyou, along the way, and at each milestone, and at the end of the journey. (Your point 5 is part of this).


Ellen Weber

Great post and much to think about here, Angela. Thanks for a fresh look at the role of a leader in action. Thanks also for asking readers' ideas:-)

You likely covered this embedded in your well designed leader qualities, but I've been thinking lately about great leaders who inspire others by how they risk for growth. What is the evidence of their courageous risks that would inspire others to step beyond the broken systems that hold learners back?

After 30 years in the field, I remain deeply concerned that we have clung to broken systems and built boring routines on tattered turf. Leaders who inspire others around them, also tend to value differences, foster equity, jumpstart innovation, add relevancy to content, welcome risks, and test in intelligence-fair ways.

Great leaders shine brilliant lights away from broken places to inspire another trek to finer peaks - where learning captures minds. Gandhi said it best, and you inspire its pathways here. Great discussion!

Angela Maiers

David and Ellen-
You both make powerful points that must be infused into the discussion and understanding of leadership. David, the idea of external vision is important. Staying deeply committed to that external vision absolutely requires the risk Ellen was speaking of.

Ellen, you quoted Ghandi, but I quote you when you say: Great leaders shine brilliant lights away from broken places to inspire another trek to finer peaks - where learning captures minds. Those are words to hang onto. Thank you both for adding to the conversation!

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